In a landmark study in children and teenagers with type 1 diabetes, JDRF-funded researchers at the University of Cambridge showed that using a first-generation artificial pancreas system overnight can lower the risk of low blood sugar emergencies while sleeping, and at the same time improve diabetes control.
The Squash Diabetes Campaign, launched by the Georgetown University Women's Squash Team* in December 2012 and sponsored by New Generation Foundation, today announced a $125,000 grant provided by the Chicago-based Chauncey and Marion D. McCormick Family Foundation.
Shawna Wood would like nothing better than to go back to bed for another 24 hours of perfect blood sugar control. The 50-year old Wilsonville, Ore. woman has Type 1 diabetes, and she recently took part in a clinical trial of an automated replacement for her pancreas, which stopped producing insulin 9 years ago.
Engineering researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are combining automation techniques from oil refining and other diverse areas to help create a closed-loop artificial pancreas. The device will automatically monitor blood sugar levels and administer insulin to patients with Type 1 diabetes, and aims to remove much of the guesswork for those living with the chronic disease.
The National Institutes for Health (NIH) have awarded $4.5 million to a group of international diabetes researchers to engineer an artificial pancreas system that will monitor and adapt to the body's complex real-time changes in behavior and physiology.
An artificial pancreas system proved more effective at controlling nocturnal glucose levels than a sensor-augmented insulin pump, in a study of children with Type 1 diabetes treated outside the hospital setting in a diabetes camp, report researchers.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Medtronic's MiniMed 670G hybrid closed looped system, the first FDA-approved device that is intended to automatically monitor glucose (sugar) and provide appropriate basal insulin doses in people 14 years of age and older with type 1 diabetes.
The 25.8 million Americans who have diabetes may soon be free of finger pricks and daily insulin dosing. Mayo Clinic endocrinologists Yogish Kudva, M.B.B.S., and Ananda Basu, M.B.B.S., M.D., are developing an artificial pancreas that will deliver insulin automatically and with an individualized precision never before possible.