It is estimated that between 10 and 17% of the population has suffered tinnitus at some time in their lives, according to a number of international studies.
Three specialists from the leading provider of tinnitus treatments in the UK have joined experts from Whipps Cross University Hospital to deliver a paper on the causes, assessment, and management of a less common but more troublesome form of the condition.
Saturday 31st of January sees the launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week. This year a public event will take place, hosted by The Neuromod Clinic in conjunction with the Irish Tinnitus Association. This free of charge event will take place at The Hermitage Medical Clinic, Lucan, Dublin at 10.30am on Saturday the 31st January.
Clinical trials of the new therapy, called Acoustic Coordinated Reset (ACR), have shown that it reduces the loudness and annoyance caused by tinnitus in seven out of 10 patients.
Those suffering from nagging tinnitus can benefit from internet-based therapy just as much as patients who take part in group therapy sessions. These are the findings of a German-Swedish study in which patients with moderate to severe tinnitus tried out various forms of therapy over a ten-week period.
New research has found giving up caffeine does not relieve tinnitus and acute caffeine withdrawal might add to the problem. This is the first study of its kind to look at the effect of caffeine consumption on tinnitus.
Tinnitus — what many think of as "ringing in the ears" — is the perception of sound without any real acoustic stimulation. Sound masking therapy, a common component of tinnitus treatment, is of uncertain benefit when used on its own, a new evidence review finds.
Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research.